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"Revolutionizing Wind Power Generation: The Science and Technology behind Bladeless Wind Turbines"

A bladeless wind turbine, also known as a Vortex Induced Vibrations for Energy (VIVACE) system, is a type of wind turbine that doesn’t have any blades. Instead, it uses the principle of vortex shedding to generate electricity.

The VIVACE system consists of a cylinder with an elliptical cross-section that is mounted vertically. The cylinder is designed to oscillate back and forth in response to the wind passing over it, which creates vortices that cause the cylinder to vibrate. The vibration is then converted into electricity using an electromagnetic generator.

One of the advantages of bladeless wind turbines is that they are quieter and less visually obtrusive than traditional wind turbines. They also have a smaller footprint and are easier to maintain since they don’t have any moving parts.

However, bladeless wind turbines are less efficient than traditional wind turbines and are currently more expensive to produce. They also require higher wind speeds to generate electricity, which limits their potential use in areas with lower wind speeds.

Despite these limitations, bladeless wind turbines show promise as a viable alternative to traditional wind turbines, particularly in urban environments where noise and visual pollution are major concerns.

How do bladeless wind turbines work?

  1. Bladeless wind turbines use a phenomenon called vorticity to generate electricity. When wind passes over the surface of the turbine, it creates vortices or swirling patterns of air. These vortices cause the turbine to vibrate and oscillate, which in turn generates electricity through an electromagnetic generator.

  2. Advantages of bladeless wind turbines: Bladeless wind turbines have several advantages over traditional wind turbines, including:

  • They are quieter and produce less noise pollution
  • They are less visually obtrusive and have a smaller footprint
  • They have fewer moving parts, making them easier to maintain and repair
  • They are less harmful to birds and other wildlife
  1. Limitations of bladeless wind turbines: Bladeless wind turbines are less efficient than traditional wind turbines and require higher wind speeds to generate electricity. This limits their use in areas with lower wind speeds. They are also currently more expensive to produce, although this could change as the technology improves and becomes more widely adopted.

  2. Types of bladeless wind turbines: There are several different types of bladeless wind turbines, including:

  • Vortex Shedding Wind Turbines: These turbines use the principle of vortex shedding to generate electricity.
  • Vortex Induced Vibrations for Energy (VIVACE) turbines: These turbines use oscillating cylinders to generate electricity.
  • Tesla-inspired turbines: These turbines use a series of interconnected disks to generate electricity.
  1. Applications of bladeless wind turbines: Bladeless wind turbines are well-suited for use in urban environments where traditional wind turbines are not feasible due to noise and visual pollution concerns. They can also be used in remote areas where traditional wind turbines are difficult to install or maintain.

About the power output of bladeless wind turbines?

  1. Power output of bladeless wind turbines: The power output of a bladeless wind turbine depends on several factors, including the size and design of the turbine, the wind speed, and the efficiency of the generator. Generally, bladeless wind turbines have a lower power output than traditional wind turbines, but they can still generate significant amounts of electricity under the right conditions.

  2. Wind speed requirements: Bladeless wind turbines require higher wind speeds than traditional wind turbines to generate electricity. Generally, they require wind speeds of at least 10 mph (16 km/h) to start generating electricity, and their maximum power output is typically achieved at wind speeds between 25 and 30 mph (40 to 48 km/h).

  3. Efficiency: The efficiency of a bladeless wind turbine depends on its design and the technology used in the generator. While bladeless wind turbines are generally less efficient than traditional wind turbines, they can still achieve efficiencies of up to 50%, depending on the design.

  4. Power output compared to traditional wind turbines: Bladeless wind turbines generally have a lower power output than traditional wind turbines of the same size. However, because they have a smaller footprint and are less visually obtrusive, they can be installed in urban environments where traditional wind turbines are not feasible, making them a valuable addition to the renewable energy mix.

  5. Applications: Bladeless wind turbines are well-suited for use in urban environments, where they can be installed on buildings or other structures without causing significant noise or visual pollution. They can also be used in remote areas where traditional wind turbines are difficult to install or maintain, such as off-grid communities or disaster relief sites.

Utility Level Wave Energy Conversion

Wave Energy Converter (WEC) designs have not yet reached the level of acceptance that has been achieved with solar panels and wind turbines. SurfWEC is a novel WEC approach to wave energy conversion invented by Mike Raftery.

The SurfWEC concept is the first WEC approach that is commercially viable for the generation of utility level electric power from ocean waves due the high kinetic energy input to the power takeoff system using a shoaling feature.

SurfWEC units are designed to create optimal surf waves offshore for WEC applications. By creating optimal surf waves with maximum steepness before breaking, SurfWEC units cause waves to input 100 times as much kinetic energy into surface floats as in typical offshore wave conditions. This is accomplished by enabling the surface floats to have average speeds 10 times faster than in typical offshore wave conditions.

SurfWEC units also have a storm avoidance feature.

When waves exceed 3 meters-high, the submerged platform is lowered near the seafloor to reduce wave loads on the platform. When waves exceed 4 meters-high, the surface float bilges are flooded and the float is lowered below the surface to reduce wave loads on the entire system.

SurfWEC LLC is a partnership of Martin & Ottaway and other industry experts that is advancing the development of the SurfWEC concept. We are one of the partners in the Global Partnership for Ocean Wave Energy Technology (GPOWET) pronounced (Jeep-o-wet). Our GPOWET partner, the Stakeholder Forum hosts the GPOWET website: https://stakeholderforum.org/2020/01/12/the-global-partnership-for-ocean-wave-energy-technology/

The GPOWET mission is to enable wave energy conversion technologies to be commercially viable anywhere on the global ocean where wave climates have sufficient power, water depths are sufficient for units to remain fully operational during hurricanes and typhoons, and there are no restrictions from other marine stakeholders which would cause a project to disrupt their use of the project location.

The GPOWET vision is to lead the human race away from dependence on fossil fuels using renewable power sources such as solar, wind, tidal, currents, and ocean surface waves.

SurfWEC LLC’s short term goals are:

  1. 1. Refining the technical design and economic model with technology partners

2. Using a big tent approach, based in New Jersey, USA with a global reach

3. Spreading the message in the present sustainable industry field

4. Identifying investing, government, technology and utility partners

SurfWEC’s ultimate goal is to rapidly scale up to utility level power generation to provide sustainable electrical power in a solar, wind and wave triad.

 

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